Panic Attack vs Anxiety Attack - Understand Key Differences

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Written by Hexahealth Care Team, last updated on 3 June 2023| min read
Panic Attack vs Anxiety Attack - Understand Key Differences

Quick Summary

Anxiety attack and panic attack are two terms often used interchangeably. However, panic attacks vs anxiety attacks are not the same thing.

While both panic attacks and anxiety attacks activate the nervous system to send a person into fight or flight mode, the difference lies in the intensity and onset of symptoms of these attacks.

An anxiety attack builds gradually, while panic attacks can occur unexpectedly.

Have you or your close ones ever experienced an anxiety attack? Or was it a panic attack? But they are the same, right?

Wrong! Anxiety attack and panic attack are two terms often used interchangeably. These terms can be confused due to some common symptoms that they share. However, panic attacks vs anxiety attacks are not the same thing.

While both panic attacks and anxiety attacks activate the nervous system to send a person into fight or flight mode, the difference lies in the intensity and onset of symptoms of these attacks.  So what is a panic attack vs an anxiety attack?

An anxiety attack builds gradually, while panic attacks can occur unexpectedly. The following blog discusses in detail the differences between a panic attack and an anxiety attack.

Panic Attacks: An Overview

A panic attack is an intense, short-lived condition that occurs unexpectedly and abruptly. 

  1. It usually happens out of the blue with no known triggers and lasts only a few minutes. 
  2. Sometimes, people may even experience panic attacks in the middle of the night, waking them up from sleep. 
  3. Panic attacks can happen to anyone. However, experiencing more than one attack may indicate a panic disorder (a mental health disorder characterised by frequent and sudden panic attacks). 

The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5), categorises panic attacks as unexpected and expected. 

  1. Unexpected panic attacks occur with no obvious cause. 
  2. Expected panic attacks are linked to external stressors like a phobia.

    For example, a person with claustrophobia (intense fear of confined spaces) may experience a panic attack if they get stuck in confined or enclosed spaces, such as lifts, tunnels, storage rooms, etc. 
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Anxiety Attacks: An Overview

Anxiety is a common feeling that most people experience at some point in their life. 

  1. Anxiety builds for a while and is usually felt in response to threatening or stressful events, such as illness, death, or everyday issues. 
  2. An anxiety attack occurs when stress and anxiety become overwhelming. 
  3. While some amount of anxiety is normal and healthy, too much can be a reason to seek medical assistance.

DSM-5 does not include anxiety attacks. However, it defines anxiety as a common symptom of several psychiatric disorders, such as:

  1. Panic disorder
  2. Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD)
  3. Separation anxiety disorder
  4. Social anxiety disorder (SAD)
  5. Agoraphobia (a fear of being in places and situations that might cause feelings of being trapped, embarrassed, or helpless) without a history of panic disorder
  6. Specific phobia
  7. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  8. Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)

Anxiety Attack vs Panic Attack

Mental health professionals diagnose panic attacks vs anxiety attacks based on the criteria found in DSM-5. Though these attacks may feel similar, panic attack and anxiety attack differences are determined through DSM criteria.

The following table shows the differences between a panic attack and an anxiety attack:

Parameters Panic Attack Anxiety Attack
Level of Distress Severe Mild, moderate, or severe
Speed of Onset Occurs abruptly Builds gradually
Duration of Symptoms Subsides after a few minutes Prevails for longer periods
Triggers No known triggers Situational triggers

Difference between Anxiety and Panic Attack

Anxiety and panic attacks differ based on their symptoms, causes, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment and complications. Let’s dive in to understand these differences.

Based on Symptoms

While the symptoms of panic attacks and anxiety attacks may feel similar, the intensity and length of the symptoms differ. Shaking or trembling and sweating are similar symptoms between panic vs anxiety attacks.

Panic Attack Anxiety Attack

Physical Symptoms

  1. Rapid heart rate
  2. Chest pain
  3. Lightheadedness or dizziness
  4. Nausea
  5. The feeling of choking
  6. Hot flashes or chills
  7. Extreme numbness or tingling
  8. Shortness of breath
  9. Stomach pain

Physical Symptoms

  1. Fatigue
  2. Rapid breathing
  3. Increased heart rate
  4. Sleep disturbances
  5. Muscle tension

 

Mental Symptoms

  1. Loss of control
  2. A sudden fear of dying
  3. Sense of detachment from oneself (depersonalisation)
  4. Sense of detachment from the world (derealisation)

Mental Symptoms

  1. Irritability
  2. Nervousness
  3. Restlessness
  4. Difficulty concentrating
  5. A sense of impending danger

Based on Causes and Risk Factors

Furthermore, the causes and risk factors of both these conditions are also different.

Panic Attack Anxiety Attack

Causes

  1. Phobias
  2. Panic disorders
  3. Social anxiety
  4. Depression

Causes

  1. Social situations
  2. Stressful job
  3. Phobias
  4. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  5. Chronic pain
  6. Chronic diseases like diabetes, heart disease, asthma, etc.
  7. Withdrawal from drugs or alcohol
  8. Side effects of medications and supplements
  9. Overuse of stimulants like caffeine
  10. Driving
  11. Thyroid problems

Risk Factors

  1. Family history of panic disorders
  2. Mental health disorders, like depression, anxiety disorders, etc.
  3. A traumatic event, such as an accident or sexual assault
  4. Childhood physical or sexual abuse
  5. Major life stress, such as the death of a loved one
  6. Major changes in life, such as a newborn baby or divorce

Risk Factors

  1. Family history of anxiety disorders
  2. Childhood abuse or trauma
  3. A traumatic event, such as a serious accident
  4. Stress due to a health condition or serious illness
  5. Certain personality types
  6. Mental disorders, such as depression

Based on Diagnosis

Healthcare professionals diagnose panic attacks, panic disorders, and anxiety disorders in a similar manner. The diagnosis starts with visiting a primary care provider who checks for physiological conditions that may be causing anxiety or panic attacks. For this, they may conduct tests such as:

  1. A physical exam
  2. Blood tests
  3. Heart tests, like an electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG)

If anxiety vs panic attacks do not result from a physical condition, a mental health expert will use the following tools for diagnosis:

  1. A psychological evaluation or questionnaire
  2. Comparing the symptoms to the criteria in DSM-5

Based on Treatment

Treatment for both panic attacks and anxiety attacks is more or less similar. A healthcare professional undertakes psychotherapy to treat panic and anxiety attacks.

Psychotherapy, also known as psychological counselling or talk therapy, the treatment focuses on reducing anxiety symptoms. 

  1. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT): The most effective psychotherapy, CBT, teaches you to recognise behaviours and thought patterns that result in troublesome feelings.
  2. Exposure Therapy: You are exposed to situations that trigger your anxiety to build your confidence and help you learn to confront those fears. 

However, the medications prescribed by the physician for both panic attacks and anxiety attacks may differ. The table below provides different medications prescribed for anxiety vs panic attacks.

Panic Attacks Anxiety Disorder

Medicines: Medicines help reduce symptoms associated with panic attacks and depression. 

  1. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).
  2. Serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs).
  3. Benzodiazepines.

Medicines: Medicines can help relieve anxiety symptoms. These include:

  1. Anti-depressants
  2. Anti-anxiety medication like buspirone
  3. Sedatives (rarely) for short-term relief from anxiety symptoms

Based on Complications

If left untreated, these attacks can cause worrisome complications and ruin the quality of life. The following table compares the complications of panic attacks vs anxiety disorder.

Panic Attack Anxiety Attack
  1. Avoiding social situations
  2. Developing specific phobias like leaving the house or fear of driving
  3. Problems at school or work
  4. Regular medical care for certain health conditions
  5. Financial problems
  6. Psychiatric disorders, like depression, anxiety disorders, etc. 
  7. Suicidal thoughts
  8. Substance misuse
  1. Insomnia (trouble sleeping)
  2. Misuse of alcohol or other substance
  3. Depression or other mental health disorders
  4. Social isolation
  5. Headache and chronic pain
  6. Digestive or bowel problems
  7. Poor quality of life
  8. Problems at school or work
  9. Suicidal thoughts

Home Remedies for Panic Attacks and Anxiety Attacks

Psychotherapy and medication are the recommended treatment options for controlling and managing panic attacks and anxiety attacks. However, certain home remedies can also help you be in control during an attack. If you experience an anxiety or panic attack, you can try the following remedies:

  1. Slow, Deep Breaths: Breathing difficulty is one of the most common symptoms of panic and anxiety attacks. When your breath quickens during these attacks, focus on each inhale and exhale.
    Fill your stomach with air as you inhale, and count down to four as you exhale. Repeat until your breathing becomes normal. 
  2. Acknowledgement: Symptoms of these attacks can be extremely frightening. You can reduce fear and anxiety by recognising and accepting your feelings and remembering that the symptoms will soon pass. 
  3. Mindfulness: Mindfulness is a technique that helps people stay grounded in the present moment. Practising this technique is especially beneficial for those who worry about the potential and perceived stressors. 
  4. Relaxation Techniques: Techniques like muscle relaxation, guided imagery, and aromatherapy can help reduce panic and anxiety symptoms. Try doing things that make you relax, such as closing your eyes, taking a bath, or using lavender.

    You can even practice creative visualisation by picturing your happy place. Imagine yourself in a happy and calm place like a mountain or beach for two minutes, then continue your daily activities. 

Prevention of Panic Attacks vs Anxiety Attacks

Experiencing symptoms of panic attacks and anxiety attacks can be an unpleasant experience. What if you could prevent these attacks? Some lifestyle changes can help you prevent anxiety vs panic attacks. They also help reduce the severity of symptoms if an attack occurs. These changes include:

  1. Reduce or manage stressors in your life
  2. Practice yoga, meditation, or deep breathing
  3. Engage in regular, moderate exercise
  4. Learn how to identify and control negative thoughts
  5. Get eight hours of sleep at night
  6. Eat a healthy, balanced diet
  7. Limit your consumption of alcohol and caffeine
  8. Join a support group for anxiety or panic

When to See a Doctor?

Anxiety vs panic attacks, though extremely uncomfortable, are not dangerous. However, these attacks can become hard to manage and worsen without treatment. Symptoms of a panic attack can sometimes be similar to symptoms of other medical conditions such as heart attack.

Therefore, it is important to consult your healthcare provider if you are not sure what is causing these symptoms. See your healthcare provider if:

  1. Your worry interferes with your work, relationships, and other aspects of life
  2. Your anxiety, panic, fear, or worry is becoming difficult to control 
  3. You think that your anxiety or panic could be linked to a physical health condition
  4. You feel depressed and have trouble with substance use
  5. You experience suicidal thoughts and behaviours (seek medical care immediately)

Takeaway

While there are differences between anxiety and panic attacks, they share similar symptoms, causes, and risk factors. Anxiety attacks often occur after periods of prolonged worry. On the other hand, panic attacks occur suddenly, are usually more intense, and are accompanied by severe physical symptoms. They are not physically harmful. However, they can take a toll on your mental health and interfere with the things you love to do. 

If you have symptoms of these attacks, do not feel embarrassed to consult a professional. It is important to talk to your provider if you experience episodes of anxiety or panic. The mental health professionals at HexaHealth will help you overcome the fears and anxieties that trigger these attacks. Furthermore, we will recommend medications and psychotherapy to treat anxiety and panic attacks. 

Suggested Reads

Yoga for Anxiety Homoeopathic Medicines for Anxiety
Reduce Anxiety Immediately Remedies for Reducing Anxiety
Anxiety Meaning Anxiety and Depression

Frequently Asked Questions

Both panic attacks and anxiety attacks occur due to stress and anxiety. While anxiety attacks have clear, known triggers, panic attacks usually happen unexpectedly. Panic attack and anxiety attack difference lies in the intensity and duration of their symptoms. Symptoms of panic attacks are more severe but last only a few minutes. On the other hand, anxiety attacks are less severe but can last for a long time.
Unexpected panic attacks usually occur without a known cause, whereas expected panic attacks can occur due to certain conditions like phobias, panic disorders, depression, or social anxiety. Anxiety attacks can be caused due to several triggers, such as social situations, PTSD, chronic diseases, side effects of medications, overuse of stimulants, withdrawal from drugs or alcohol, etc.
The major difference between a panic attack and an anxiety attack lies in the onset, severity, and duration of their symptoms. While anxiety often has clear triggers and prevails for longer periods, panic attacks occur unexpectedly and last only for a few minutes.
A silent panic attack is when a person with panic or anxiety disorder has a panic attack without noticeable symptoms, such as shaking, sweating, hyperventilating, etc. A silent panic attack symptoms include feeling dizzy, tingling in the limbs, derealisation or depersonalisation, increased heart rate or heart skipping a beat, headaches, intrusive thoughts, changes in vision, etc.
Symptoms of panic attacks vs anxiety attacks are more or less similar. However, the symptoms differ in their severity, onset and duration. Anxiety builds gradually and lasts for a prolonged period. Panic attack symptoms occur suddenly and last for a few minutes. Symptoms of panic attacks are usually more severe than anxiety attacks. Furthermore, people with panic attacks may experience additional symptoms such as loss of control, a sudden fear of dying, derealisation, or depersonalisation.
Although panic attacks and anxiety attacks are often used interchangeably, they are different. Panic attacks are usually more intense and can occur with or without a trigger; anxiety attacks are a response to a perceived threat.
Yes, panic attacks and anxiety attacks can occur simultaneously. For example, you might have anxiety due to a potentially stressful event, such as giving an examination. When the situation arrives, it triggers a panic attack. During the panic attack, the previous anxiety symptoms do not go away; they only get covered by the intensity of the panic attack. After the panic attack subsides, the symptoms of anxiety remain. Hence the panic attack gets over, but the anxiety continues.
Anxiety attack usually comes before a panic attack. Anxiety gradually builds over time. Having anxiety about a potentially stressful situation may lead to a panic attack. However, it is not always true. Panic attacks and anxiety attacks can also occur independently.
Panic attacks vs anxiety attacks usually result from the same triggers. Some common triggers of attacks include stress, traumatic events, other health conditions, certain medications, caffeine, substance abuse, social events, etc.
Both panic attacks and anxiety attacks can affect the quality of life if left untreated. These attacks may cause problems at work and school and develop specific phobias. Furthermore, they may lead to depression and suicidal thoughts. However, panic attacks are considered a little riskier as their symptoms are more severe than anxiety attacks.

A. While a panic attack may feel like a heart attack, it does not cause a heart attack. A blockage in one or more blood vessels of the heart causes a heart attack, which is unrelated to a panic attack.

However, stress and anxiety can cause high blood pressure, increasing heart attack risk. Moreover, they might play a role in the development of coronary artery disease. Since panic attacks and anxiety attacks can result from an anxiety disorder, both can damage the heart.

Although panic attacks vs anxiety attacks usually have similar symptoms, you can know which one you have by the severity and duration of the symptoms. You may experience more severe physical and mental symptoms during a panic attack than an anxiety attack.

Additionally, the symptoms during a panic attack will subside within a few minutes, whereas the symptoms will be experienced for a prolonged period during an anxiety attack. A few mental symptoms of panic attacks that may distinguish them from anxiety attacks include loss of control, a feeling of dying, derealisation, and depersonalisation.

The treatment for panic attacks vs anxiety disorder is more or less similar. The main treatment options for these attacks include medications and psychotherapy.

Medicines such as anti-depressants, anti-anxiety medications, SSRIs, and SNRIs help relieve the symptoms. Psychotherapy usually includes cognitive behavioural therapy and exposure therapy. The doctor may prescribe one or both treatments depending on the patient’s condition and preference.

A. The treatment for panic attacks vs anxiety attacks usually follows the same approach. The doctor prescribes medication and psychotherapy for both anxiety and panic attacks.

Medicines prescribed for these attacks include anti-depressants like SSRIs and SNRIs, anti-anxiety medicines, and benzodiazepines (tranquillisers or sedatives to slow down activity in the brain and nervous system).

A. Doctors may identify the difference between panic attacks and anxiety attacks by noticing their symptoms, severity, and duration. While the symptoms of a panic attack may be more severe and last for a few minutes, anxiety attack symptoms may last for a prolonged period.

The doctor may conduct a psychological evaluation and compare the symptoms with DSM-5 criteria to diagnose the conditions.

You do not need to go to the hospital for most panic and anxiety attacks. Generally, you can manage or control the symptoms by practising relaxation techniques at home. However, you should visit a hospital when:

  1. Panic and anxiety could be linked to a physiological condition
  2. Your panic or anxiety starts interfering with your relationships and work
  3. It is becoming difficult to control your anxiety, panic, or fear
  4. You feel depressed and have suicidal thoughts
A panic attack is a brief episode of intense anxiety. Both panic attacks and anxiety attacks develop from similar factors. These factors include a family history of panic or anxiety attacks, childhood abuse, a traumatic event, stress due to health conditions, mental disorders, major life changes, etc. People with certain personalities are more prone to having anxiety.
Long-term effects of both panic attacks and anxiety attacks include your brain releasing stress hormones regularly. This increases the frequency of symptoms like dizziness, headaches, and depression. Long-term anxiety can also be related to chronic illnesses like heart disease. 
Unlike anxiety, which often occurs due to clear triggers, panic attacks happen suddenly and last only for a few minutes. People with panic attacks may experience additional physical symptoms such as hot flashes, chills, chest pain, lightheadedness, and stomach discomfort.

A. While panic attacks, anxiety attacks, and mental breakdowns may seem similar and used interchangeably, they are not the same. A panic attack is an episode of increased fear or anxiety that can happen to any person at any time.

Anxiety attack occurs due to a gradual buildup of anxiety resulting from clear triggers. Mental or nervous breakdown is a type of anxiety disorder that results from an acute anxiety attack that disrupts people’s everyday lives. 

Panic attacks cannot be cured entirely. However, you can effectively manage it to the point where it no longer significantly impairs your life. Some strategies to stop or manage panic attacks include:

  1. Take medications like anti-anxiety drugs, SSRIs, and SNRIs
  2. Seek counselling
  3. Do deep breathing
  4. Practice mindfulness
  5. Use muscle relaxation techniques
  6. Engage in moderate exercise
  7. Picture your happy place
Both panic attacks and anxiety attacks occur due to stress and anxiety. While anxiety attacks have clear, known triggers, panic attacks usually happen unexpectedly. Panic attack and anxiety attack difference lies in the intensity and duration of their symptoms. Symptoms of panic attacks are more severe but last only a few minutes. On the other hand, anxiety attacks are less severe but can last for a long time.
Unexpected panic attacks usually occur without a known cause, whereas expected panic attacks can occur due to certain conditions like phobias, panic disorders, depression, or social anxiety. Anxiety attacks can be caused due to several triggers, such as social situations, PTSD, chronic diseases, side effects of medications, overuse of stimulants, withdrawal from drugs or alcohol, etc.
The major difference between a panic attack and an anxiety attack lies in the onset, severity, and duration of their symptoms. While anxiety often has clear triggers and prevails for longer periods, panic attacks occur unexpectedly and last only for a few minutes.
A silent panic attack is when a person with panic or anxiety disorder has a panic attack without noticeable symptoms, such as shaking, sweating, hyperventilating, etc. A silent panic attack symptoms include feeling dizzy, tingling in the limbs, derealisation or depersonalisation, increased heart rate or heart skipping a beat, headaches, intrusive thoughts, changes in vision, etc.
Symptoms of panic attacks vs anxiety attacks are more or less similar. However, the symptoms differ in their severity, onset and duration. Anxiety builds gradually and lasts for a prolonged period. Panic attack symptoms occur suddenly and last for a few minutes. Symptoms of panic attacks are usually more severe than anxiety attacks. Furthermore, people with panic attacks may experience additional symptoms such as loss of control, a sudden fear of dying, derealisation, or depersonalisation.
Although panic attacks and anxiety attacks are often used interchangeably, they are different. Panic attacks are usually more intense and can occur with or without a trigger; anxiety attacks are a response to a perceived threat.
Yes, panic attacks and anxiety attacks can occur simultaneously. For example, you might have anxiety due to a potentially stressful event, such as giving an examination. When the situation arrives, it triggers a panic attack. During the panic attack, the previous anxiety symptoms do not go away; they only get covered by the intensity of the panic attack. After the panic attack subsides, the symptoms of anxiety remain. Hence the panic attack gets over, but the anxiety continues.
Anxiety attack usually comes before a panic attack. Anxiety gradually builds over time. Having anxiety about a potentially stressful situation may lead to a panic attack. However, it is not always true. Panic attacks and anxiety attacks can also occur independently.
Panic attacks vs anxiety attacks usually result from the same triggers. Some common triggers of attacks include stress, traumatic events, other health conditions, certain medications, caffeine, substance abuse, social events, etc.
Both panic attacks and anxiety attacks can affect the quality of life if left untreated. These attacks may cause problems at work and school and develop specific phobias. Furthermore, they may lead to depression and suicidal thoughts. However, panic attacks are considered a little riskier as their symptoms are more severe than anxiety attacks.

A. While a panic attack may feel like a heart attack, it does not cause a heart attack. A blockage in one or more blood vessels of the heart causes a heart attack, which is unrelated to a panic attack.

However, stress and anxiety can cause high blood pressure, increasing heart attack risk. Moreover, they might play a role in the development of coronary artery disease. Since panic attacks and anxiety attacks can result from an anxiety disorder, both can damage the heart.

Although panic attacks vs anxiety attacks usually have similar symptoms, you can know which one you have by the severity and duration of the symptoms. You may experience more severe physical and mental symptoms during a panic attack than an anxiety attack.

Additionally, the symptoms during a panic attack will subside within a few minutes, whereas the symptoms will be experienced for a prolonged period during an anxiety attack. A few mental symptoms of panic attacks that may distinguish them from anxiety attacks include loss of control, a feeling of dying, derealisation, and depersonalisation.

The treatment for panic attacks vs anxiety disorder is more or less similar. The main treatment options for these attacks include medications and psychotherapy.

Medicines such as anti-depressants, anti-anxiety medications, SSRIs, and SNRIs help relieve the symptoms. Psychotherapy usually includes cognitive behavioural therapy and exposure therapy. The doctor may prescribe one or both treatments depending on the patient’s condition and preference.

A. The treatment for panic attacks vs anxiety attacks usually follows the same approach. The doctor prescribes medication and psychotherapy for both anxiety and panic attacks.

Medicines prescribed for these attacks include anti-depressants like SSRIs and SNRIs, anti-anxiety medicines, and benzodiazepines (tranquillisers or sedatives to slow down activity in the brain and nervous system).

A. Doctors may identify the difference between panic attacks and anxiety attacks by noticing their symptoms, severity, and duration. While the symptoms of a panic attack may be more severe and last for a few minutes, anxiety attack symptoms may last for a prolonged period.

The doctor may conduct a psychological evaluation and compare the symptoms with DSM-5 criteria to diagnose the conditions.

You do not need to go to the hospital for most panic and anxiety attacks. Generally, you can manage or control the symptoms by practising relaxation techniques at home. However, you should visit a hospital when:

  1. Panic and anxiety could be linked to a physiological condition
  2. Your panic or anxiety starts interfering with your relationships and work
  3. It is becoming difficult to control your anxiety, panic, or fear
  4. You feel depressed and have suicidal thoughts
A panic attack is a brief episode of intense anxiety. Both panic attacks and anxiety attacks develop from similar factors. These factors include a family history of panic or anxiety attacks, childhood abuse, a traumatic event, stress due to health conditions, mental disorders, major life changes, etc. People with certain personalities are more prone to having anxiety.
Long-term effects of both panic attacks and anxiety attacks include your brain releasing stress hormones regularly. This increases the frequency of symptoms like dizziness, headaches, and depression. Long-term anxiety can also be related to chronic illnesses like heart disease. 
Unlike anxiety, which often occurs due to clear triggers, panic attacks happen suddenly and last only for a few minutes. People with panic attacks may experience additional physical symptoms such as hot flashes, chills, chest pain, lightheadedness, and stomach discomfort.

A. While panic attacks, anxiety attacks, and mental breakdowns may seem similar and used interchangeably, they are not the same. A panic attack is an episode of increased fear or anxiety that can happen to any person at any time.

Anxiety attack occurs due to a gradual buildup of anxiety resulting from clear triggers. Mental or nervous breakdown is a type of anxiety disorder that results from an acute anxiety attack that disrupts people’s everyday lives. 

Panic attacks cannot be cured entirely. However, you can effectively manage it to the point where it no longer significantly impairs your life. Some strategies to stop or manage panic attacks include:

  1. Take medications like anti-anxiety drugs, SSRIs, and SNRIs
  2. Seek counselling
  3. Do deep breathing
  4. Practice mindfulness
  5. Use muscle relaxation techniques
  6. Engage in moderate exercise
  7. Picture your happy place

References

All the articles on HexaHealth are supported by verified medically-recognized sources such as; peer-reviewed academic research papers, research institutions, and medical journals. Our medical reviewers also check references of the articles to prioritize accuracy and relevance. Refer to our detailed editorial policy for more information.


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Updated on : 3 June 2023

Disclaimer: We provide content on our website that is purely informative and educational in nature, but they do not contain information about all medical conditions, and not all information can apply to your personal circumstances. The content is not to be constructed as medical advice, is not intended for diagnosis and should not be used as a substitute for consultation with an appropriate certified medical or healthcare professional.
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