Microvascular Clipping Surgery - Procedure, Purpose & Results

Microvascular Clipping

Treatment Duration

clock

1 Hours

------ To ------

2 Hours

Treatment Cost

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1,70,000

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2,50,000

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Microvascular Clipping

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Microvascular Clipping or aneurysm clipping is a surgery to cut off the blood supply to a brain aneurysm. As an aneurysm grows, it can become extremely thin, leading to leaks and ruptures. These ruptures can release blood into the spaces around the brain. The neurosurgeon performs a craniotomy (removes a portion of the skull) and places a tiny clip across the aneurysm to prevent bleeding. 
Surgery Name Microvascular Clipping

Alternative Name
Aneurysm Clipping

Disease Treated
Ruptured aneurysms, Unruptured aneurysms

Benefits of the Surgery
Lifesaving Procedure, Prevents Neurological Brain Damage and Paralysis, Negligible chance of recurrence, Helps in reducing the size of larger aneurysms, Less scarring, Prevents rupture of the Aneurysm

Treated by
Neurosurgeon 

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What is Microvascular Clipping

A cerebral (brain) aneurysm can be surgically closed off from blood flow by microvascular clipping. It stops bleeding and rupturing. During this surgery, a part of the skull is typically removed and then reconstructed through a process known as a craniotomy.

While clipping can stop bleeding and stop ruptures, it cannot repair parts of the brain that the aneurysm has already harmed.
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What is Microvascular Clipping

A cerebral (brain) aneurysm can be surgically closed off from blood flow by microvascular clipping. It stops bleeding and rupturing. During this surgery, a part of the skull is typically removed and then reconstructed through a process known as a craniotomy.

While clipping can stop bleeding and stop ruptures, it cannot repair parts of the brain that the aneurysm has already harmed.

What is Microvascular Clipping

A cerebral (brain) aneurysm can be surgically closed off from blood flow by microvascular clipping. It stops bleeding and rupturing. During this surgery, a part of the skull is typically removed and then reconstructed through a process known as a craniotomy.

While clipping can stop bleeding and stop ruptures, it cannot repair parts of the brain that the aneurysm has already harmed.

Conditions treated with Microvascular Clipping

A brain aneurysm, cerebral or intracranial aneurysm, is the ballooning or bulge in the weakened area of the brain’s blood vessel. This bulging can put pressure on the brain. When the brain aneurysm expands and the blood vessel becomes too thin, the aneurysm ruptures and bleeds in the spaces around the brain (haemorrhage). 

Microvascular clipping is performed to stop this bleeding and prevent the brain aneurysm from causing more harm. While the surgery cannot fix the brain’s damaged areas, it can improve the quality of life by preventing further damage. It may be an effective treatment for:
  1. Ruptured aneurysms: When the aneurysms burst open and release blood in the spaces around the brain and skull, a condition called subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). A ruptured aneurysm occurs when there is a hole in the aneurysm sac. It is a serious medical emergency and advised to treat within 72 hours of the first bleed to prevent 
  2. Unruptured aneurysms: These may not cause any symptoms and are usually detected during regular testing for some other conditions. An unruptured aneurysm is one whose sac has no hole, and there was no previous leakage. 

Conditions treated with Microvascular Clipping

A brain aneurysm, cerebral or intracranial aneurysm, is the ballooning or bulge in the weakened area of the brain’s blood vessel. This bulging can put pressure on the brain. When the brain aneurysm expands and the blood vessel becomes too thin, the aneurysm ruptures and bleeds in the spaces around the brain (haemorrhage). 

Microvascular clipping is performed to stop this bleeding and prevent the brain aneurysm from causing more harm. While the surgery cannot fix the brain’s damaged areas, it can improve the quality of life by preventing further damage. It may be an effective treatment for:
  1. Ruptured aneurysms: When the aneurysms burst open and release blood in the spaces around the brain and skull, a condition called subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). A ruptured aneurysm occurs when there is a hole in the aneurysm sac. It is a serious medical emergency and advised to treat within 72 hours of the first bleed to prevent 
  2. Unruptured aneurysms: These may not cause any symptoms and are usually detected during regular testing for some other conditions. An unruptured aneurysm is one whose sac has no hole, and there was no previous leakage. 

Conditions treated with Microvascular Clipping

A brain aneurysm, cerebral or intracranial aneurysm, is the ballooning or bulge in the weakened area of the brain’s blood vessel. This bulging can put pressure on the brain. When the brain aneurysm expands and the blood vessel becomes too thin, the aneurysm ruptures and bleeds in the spaces around the brain (haemorrhage). 

Microvascular clipping is performed to stop this bleeding and prevent the brain aneurysm from causing more harm. While the surgery cannot fix the brain’s damaged areas, it can improve the quality of life by preventing further damage. It may be an effective treatment for:
  1. Ruptured aneurysms: When the aneurysms burst open and release blood in the spaces around the brain and skull, a condition called subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). A ruptured aneurysm occurs when there is a hole in the aneurysm sac. It is a serious medical emergency and advised to treat within 72 hours of the first bleed to prevent 
  2. Unruptured aneurysms: These may not cause any symptoms and are usually detected during regular testing for some other conditions. An unruptured aneurysm is one whose sac has no hole, and there was no previous leakage. 

Who needs Microvascular Clipping?

Microvascular Clipping 

Who needs Microvascular Clipping?

Microvascular Clipping 

Who needs Microvascular Clipping?

Microvascular Clipping 

How is Microvascular Clipping performed?

Typically, a microvascular clipping surgery undergoes the following steps:

Step 1: Preparing the patient

  1. You will be given general anaesthesia for the procedure. Once you are asleep, the team will place your head in a three-pin skull fixation device.
  2. The device attaches to the operating table and holds your head in place during the surgery. Next, the team will prepare the incision area of the scalp. 

Step 2: Performing a craniotomy

  1. The surgeon will perform a craniotomy in your skull, depending on the aneurysm location. He/she will make a skin incision to expose the skull and lift the skin and muscles off the bone.
  2. Next, he/she will use a drill to make small burr holes in your skull and use a special saw called a craniotome to cut an outline of the bone window.
  3. The bone flap is lifted to expose the dura mater (the brain’s protective covering) and kept aside safely to be reattached after the procedure. 

Step 3: Exposing the aneurysm

  1. The surgeon opens the dura mater to expose the brain.
  2. He/she will use imaging tests to locate the artery and follow it to the aneurysm. The aneurysm will be separated from the nearby healthy tissue. 

Step 4: Inserting the clip

  1. After the aneurysm is isolated from other structures, the aneurysm neck is prepared for clipping. The surgeon will hold the titanium clip with a tweezer-like applier and place it across the aneurysm neck.
  2. The clip’s jaws close around the aneurysm neck, pinching it off from the parent artery. The clip will remain in place to prevent future bleeding and rupture. 

Step 5: Checking the clip

The surgeon will check the clip to ensure that it is not blocking the parent artery and the other arteries. He/she punctures the aneurysm dome with a needle to ensure that blood is no longer filling in the aneurysm.
An intraoperative angiography may also be performed to examine blood flow through the parent artery.  

Step 6: Closing the craniotomy

After the clipping is done, the surgeon will close the dura mater with stitches. He/she will replace the removed bone flap and secure it to the skull with titanium plates and screws.
Next, the surgeon will attach the muscles and skin with sutures and place a dressing over the incision. 

How is Microvascular Clipping performed?

Typically, a microvascular clipping surgery undergoes the following steps:

Step 1: Preparing the patient

  1. You will be given general anaesthesia for the procedure. Once you are asleep, the team will place your head in a three-pin skull fixation device.
  2. The device attaches to the operating table and holds your head in place during the surgery. Next, the team will prepare the incision area of the scalp. 

Step 2: Performing a craniotomy

  1. The surgeon will perform a craniotomy in your skull, depending on the aneurysm location. He/she will make a skin incision to expose the skull and lift the skin and muscles off the bone.
  2. Next, he/she will use a drill to make small burr holes in your skull and use a special saw called a craniotome to cut an outline of the bone window.
  3. The bone flap is lifted to expose the dura mater (the brain’s protective covering) and kept aside safely to be reattached after the procedure. 

Step 3: Exposing the aneurysm

  1. The surgeon opens the dura mater to expose the brain.
  2. He/she will use imaging tests to locate the artery and follow it to the aneurysm. The aneurysm will be separated from the nearby healthy tissue. 

Step 4: Inserting the clip

  1. After the aneurysm is isolated from other structures, the aneurysm neck is prepared for clipping. The surgeon will hold the titanium clip with a tweezer-like applier and place it across the aneurysm neck.
  2. The clip’s jaws close around the aneurysm neck, pinching it off from the parent artery. The clip will remain in place to prevent future bleeding and rupture. 

Step 5: Checking the clip

The surgeon will check the clip to ensure that it is not blocking the parent artery and the other arteries. He/she punctures the aneurysm dome with a needle to ensure that blood is no longer filling in the aneurysm.
An intraoperative angiography may also be performed to examine blood flow through the parent artery.  

Step 6: Closing the craniotomy

After the clipping is done, the surgeon will close the dura mater with stitches. He/she will replace the removed bone flap and secure it to the skull with titanium plates and screws.
Next, the surgeon will attach the muscles and skin with sutures and place a dressing over the incision. 

How is Microvascular Clipping performed?

Typically, a microvascular clipping surgery undergoes the following steps:

Step 1: Preparing the patient

  1. You will be given general anaesthesia for the procedure. Once you are asleep, the team will place your head in a three-pin skull fixation device.
  2. The device attaches to the operating table and holds your head in place during the surgery. Next, the team will prepare the incision area of the scalp. 

Step 2: Performing a craniotomy

  1. The surgeon will perform a craniotomy in your skull, depending on the aneurysm location. He/she will make a skin incision to expose the skull and lift the skin and muscles off the bone.
  2. Next, he/she will use a drill to make small burr holes in your skull and use a special saw called a craniotome to cut an outline of the bone window.
  3. The bone flap is lifted to expose the dura mater (the brain’s protective covering) and kept aside safely to be reattached after the procedure. 

Step 3: Exposing the aneurysm

  1. The surgeon opens the dura mater to expose the brain.
  2. He/she will use imaging tests to locate the artery and follow it to the aneurysm. The aneurysm will be separated from the nearby healthy tissue. 

Step 4: Inserting the clip

  1. After the aneurysm is isolated from other structures, the aneurysm neck is prepared for clipping. The surgeon will hold the titanium clip with a tweezer-like applier and place it across the aneurysm neck.
  2. The clip’s jaws close around the aneurysm neck, pinching it off from the parent artery. The clip will remain in place to prevent future bleeding and rupture. 

Step 5: Checking the clip

The surgeon will check the clip to ensure that it is not blocking the parent artery and the other arteries. He/she punctures the aneurysm dome with a needle to ensure that blood is no longer filling in the aneurysm.
An intraoperative angiography may also be performed to examine blood flow through the parent artery.  

Step 6: Closing the craniotomy

After the clipping is done, the surgeon will close the dura mater with stitches. He/she will replace the removed bone flap and secure it to the skull with titanium plates and screws.
Next, the surgeon will attach the muscles and skin with sutures and place a dressing over the incision. 

What Can You Expect Before the Surgery?

If you have a ruptured aneurysm, you will immediately be taken to the operating room, where the surgeon will perform microvascular clipping. For an unruptured aneurysm:
  1. You will have an appointment with an anaesthesiologist for a pre-anaesthetic checkup and discuss the anaesthesia options. 
  2. He/she will discuss the effects and risks of anaesthesia. 
  3. Your doctor will enquire about your medical history (previous surgeries, allergies, etc.
  4. You will have to undergo presurgical tests, including blood and imaging tests, including ultrasound, CT scan, MRI, and angiogram. 
  5. They will ask you about the medications, herbs, and supplements you are taking. 
  6. You will have to stop taking NSAIDs like ibuprofen and blood thinners like aspirin seven days before the surgery. 
  7. Your provider will inform you to stop smoking and drinking alcohol one week before and two weeks after the surgery to prevent bleeding and healing issues. 
  8. You should inform your doctor if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. 
  9. The doctor may ask you to wash your skin and hair with an antiseptic shampoo the day before the surgery to reduce the risk of surgical site infections. 
  10. They will inform you to stop eating or drinking after midnight on the night of the surgery. 
  11. The doctor will briefly explain the procedure, hospital stay, estimated cost, and insurance formalities. 

What Can You Expect on the Day of the Surgery?

  1. The hospital team will ask you to fill out paperwork and sign consent formalities, giving your permission for the surgery. 
  2. After being admitted to the hospital, you must change into a hospital gown and remove all jewellery pieces. 
  3. Someone from the nursing team will shave the hair in the incision site. 
  4. The doctor will record your last meal. 
  5. You may take the permitted medicines with a sip of water. 
  6. The anaesthesiologist will monitor your vitals. 
  7. The team will shift you to the OT room. 

What Can You Expect During the Surgery?

  1. You will lie on the operating table in the OT room. 
  2. The anaesthesiologist will start an intravenous line for medications and fluids in your arm or hand. 
  3. They will administer general anaesthesia to make you sleep throughout the procedure. 
  4. Once you are asleep, the team will attach your head to the table with a skull fixation device. 
  5. The medical team will clean the incision site with an antiseptic solution. 
  6. The anaesthesiologist will monitor your vitals, including heartbeat, blood pressure and breathing, throughout the surgery. 
  7. The surgeon will make an incision, perform a craniotomy, and insert a clip to treat the brain aneurysm. 
  8. The surgeon closes the craniotomy and applies a bandage to the wound. 
  9. The complete procedure generally takes three to five hours or longer if the craniotomy is complex. 

What Can You Expect Before the Surgery?

If you have a ruptured aneurysm, you will immediately be taken to the operating room, where the surgeon will perform microvascular clipping. For an unruptured aneurysm:
  1. You will have an appointment with an anaesthesiologist for a pre-anaesthetic checkup and discuss the anaesthesia options. 
  2. He/she will discuss the effects and risks of anaesthesia. 
  3. Your doctor will enquire about your medical history (previous surgeries, allergies, etc.
  4. You will have to undergo presurgical tests, including blood and imaging tests, including ultrasound, CT scan, MRI, and angiogram. 
  5. They will ask you about the medications, herbs, and supplements you are taking. 
  6. You will have to stop taking NSAIDs like ibuprofen and blood thinners like aspirin seven days before the surgery. 
  7. Your provider will inform you to stop smoking and drinking alcohol one week before and two weeks after the surgery to prevent bleeding and healing issues. 
  8. You should inform your doctor if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. 
  9. The doctor may ask you to wash your skin and hair with an antiseptic shampoo the day before the surgery to reduce the risk of surgical site infections. 
  10. They will inform you to stop eating or drinking after midnight on the night of the surgery. 
  11. The doctor will briefly explain the procedure, hospital stay, estimated cost, and insurance formalities. 

What Can You Expect on the Day of the Surgery?

  1. The hospital team will ask you to fill out paperwork and sign consent formalities, giving your permission for the surgery. 
  2. After being admitted to the hospital, you must change into a hospital gown and remove all jewellery pieces. 
  3. Someone from the nursing team will shave the hair in the incision site. 
  4. The doctor will record your last meal. 
  5. You may take the permitted medicines with a sip of water. 
  6. The anaesthesiologist will monitor your vitals. 
  7. The team will shift you to the OT room. 

What Can You Expect During the Surgery?

  1. You will lie on the operating table in the OT room. 
  2. The anaesthesiologist will start an intravenous line for medications and fluids in your arm or hand. 
  3. They will administer general anaesthesia to make you sleep throughout the procedure. 
  4. Once you are asleep, the team will attach your head to the table with a skull fixation device. 
  5. The medical team will clean the incision site with an antiseptic solution. 
  6. The anaesthesiologist will monitor your vitals, including heartbeat, blood pressure and breathing, throughout the surgery. 
  7. The surgeon will make an incision, perform a craniotomy, and insert a clip to treat the brain aneurysm. 
  8. The surgeon closes the craniotomy and applies a bandage to the wound. 
  9. The complete procedure generally takes three to five hours or longer if the craniotomy is complex. 

What Can You Expect Before the Surgery?

If you have a ruptured aneurysm, you will immediately be taken to the operating room, where the surgeon will perform microvascular clipping. For an unruptured aneurysm:
  1. You will have an appointment with an anaesthesiologist for a pre-anaesthetic checkup and discuss the anaesthesia options. 
  2. He/she will discuss the effects and risks of anaesthesia. 
  3. Your doctor will enquire about your medical history (previous surgeries, allergies, etc.
  4. You will have to undergo presurgical tests, including blood and imaging tests, including ultrasound, CT scan, MRI, and angiogram. 
  5. They will ask you about the medications, herbs, and supplements you are taking. 
  6. You will have to stop taking NSAIDs like ibuprofen and blood thinners like aspirin seven days before the surgery. 
  7. Your provider will inform you to stop smoking and drinking alcohol one week before and two weeks after the surgery to prevent bleeding and healing issues. 
  8. You should inform your doctor if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. 
  9. The doctor may ask you to wash your skin and hair with an antiseptic shampoo the day before the surgery to reduce the risk of surgical site infections. 
  10. They will inform you to stop eating or drinking after midnight on the night of the surgery. 
  11. The doctor will briefly explain the procedure, hospital stay, estimated cost, and insurance formalities. 

What Can You Expect on the Day of the Surgery?

  1. The hospital team will ask you to fill out paperwork and sign consent formalities, giving your permission for the surgery. 
  2. After being admitted to the hospital, you must change into a hospital gown and remove all jewellery pieces. 
  3. Someone from the nursing team will shave the hair in the incision site. 
  4. The doctor will record your last meal. 
  5. You may take the permitted medicines with a sip of water. 
  6. The anaesthesiologist will monitor your vitals. 
  7. The team will shift you to the OT room. 

What Can You Expect During the Surgery?

  1. You will lie on the operating table in the OT room. 
  2. The anaesthesiologist will start an intravenous line for medications and fluids in your arm or hand. 
  3. They will administer general anaesthesia to make you sleep throughout the procedure. 
  4. Once you are asleep, the team will attach your head to the table with a skull fixation device. 
  5. The medical team will clean the incision site with an antiseptic solution. 
  6. The anaesthesiologist will monitor your vitals, including heartbeat, blood pressure and breathing, throughout the surgery. 
  7. The surgeon will make an incision, perform a craniotomy, and insert a clip to treat the brain aneurysm. 
  8. The surgeon closes the craniotomy and applies a bandage to the wound. 
  9. The complete procedure generally takes three to five hours or longer if the craniotomy is complex. 

What Can You Expect After the Surgery?

In the hospital

  1. After the procedure, the team will shift you to the recovery room, where your vitals and anaesthesia effect are monitored. 
  2. Once you wake up from the effect of anaesthesia, the team will move you to an intensive care unit for observation. 
  3. You may experience pain, nausea, and headache after the surgery. 
  4. The doctor will give you medications to manage these symptoms. 
  5. After about 24-48 hours of observation, you’ll be moved to a regular room. 
  6. Generally, you get discharged from the hospital four to six days after the surgery. 
  7. You may need to stay longer if there are any complications. 
  8. Your doctor will provide home care and follow-up instructions before discharge. 

At Home

Activities Allowed:
  1. Engage in light walking for 5 to 10 minutes after every 3 to 4 hours. 
  2. You should gradually increase your walking. 
  3. You might experience some swelling and bruising of the face. It can take several weeks to go away. 
  4. Sleep with your head elevated.
  5. Apply ice 3 to 4 times per day to reduce swelling and pain. 
Incision Care:
  1. You should wash your hair with mild baby shampoo. 
  2. Don’t scrub your incision or let water beat hard on it. Pat dry.
  3. Don’t submerge the incision in a pool or tub.
  4. Don’t apply lotion or ointments on the incision.
  5. You may hear strange noises inside your head, such as cracking or popping. This is normal as air and fluid reabsorb.
Activities not allowed:
  1. Avoid engaging in strenuous activities and lifting heavy objects. 
  2. Don’t smoke or drink alcohol, as it may interfere with healing. 
  3. Don’t drive or fly until your doctor permits. 
Diet and Medications:
  1. Take pain medications as directed by your doctor. 
  2. Eat high-fibrous food and drink lots of water. 

First Follow-Up Appointment

  1. Your doctor will schedule the first follow-up appointment about two weeks after the surgery.
  2. The doctor will remove the sutures during this visit, examine your recovery, and provide further follow-up instructions. Furthermore, ask the doctor when you can return to work. 

What Can You Expect After the Surgery?

In the hospital

  1. After the procedure, the team will shift you to the recovery room, where your vitals and anaesthesia effect are monitored. 
  2. Once you wake up from the effect of anaesthesia, the team will move you to an intensive care unit for observation. 
  3. You may experience pain, nausea, and headache after the surgery. 
  4. The doctor will give you medications to manage these symptoms. 
  5. After about 24-48 hours of observation, you’ll be moved to a regular room. 
  6. Generally, you get discharged from the hospital four to six days after the surgery. 
  7. You may need to stay longer if there are any complications. 
  8. Your doctor will provide home care and follow-up instructions before discharge. 

At Home

Activities Allowed:
  1. Engage in light walking for 5 to 10 minutes after every 3 to 4 hours. 
  2. You should gradually increase your walking. 
  3. You might experience some swelling and bruising of the face. It can take several weeks to go away. 
  4. Sleep with your head elevated.
  5. Apply ice 3 to 4 times per day to reduce swelling and pain. 
Incision Care:
  1. You should wash your hair with mild baby shampoo. 
  2. Don’t scrub your incision or let water beat hard on it. Pat dry.
  3. Don’t submerge the incision in a pool or tub.
  4. Don’t apply lotion or ointments on the incision.
  5. You may hear strange noises inside your head, such as cracking or popping. This is normal as air and fluid reabsorb.
Activities not allowed:
  1. Avoid engaging in strenuous activities and lifting heavy objects. 
  2. Don’t smoke or drink alcohol, as it may interfere with healing. 
  3. Don’t drive or fly until your doctor permits. 
Diet and Medications:
  1. Take pain medications as directed by your doctor. 
  2. Eat high-fibrous food and drink lots of water. 

First Follow-Up Appointment

  1. Your doctor will schedule the first follow-up appointment about two weeks after the surgery.
  2. The doctor will remove the sutures during this visit, examine your recovery, and provide further follow-up instructions. Furthermore, ask the doctor when you can return to work. 

What Can You Expect After the Surgery?

In the hospital

  1. After the procedure, the team will shift you to the recovery room, where your vitals and anaesthesia effect are monitored. 
  2. Once you wake up from the effect of anaesthesia, the team will move you to an intensive care unit for observation. 
  3. You may experience pain, nausea, and headache after the surgery. 
  4. The doctor will give you medications to manage these symptoms. 
  5. After about 24-48 hours of observation, you’ll be moved to a regular room. 
  6. Generally, you get discharged from the hospital four to six days after the surgery. 
  7. You may need to stay longer if there are any complications. 
  8. Your doctor will provide home care and follow-up instructions before discharge. 

At Home

Activities Allowed:
  1. Engage in light walking for 5 to 10 minutes after every 3 to 4 hours. 
  2. You should gradually increase your walking. 
  3. You might experience some swelling and bruising of the face. It can take several weeks to go away. 
  4. Sleep with your head elevated.
  5. Apply ice 3 to 4 times per day to reduce swelling and pain. 
Incision Care:
  1. You should wash your hair with mild baby shampoo. 
  2. Don’t scrub your incision or let water beat hard on it. Pat dry.
  3. Don’t submerge the incision in a pool or tub.
  4. Don’t apply lotion or ointments on the incision.
  5. You may hear strange noises inside your head, such as cracking or popping. This is normal as air and fluid reabsorb.
Activities not allowed:
  1. Avoid engaging in strenuous activities and lifting heavy objects. 
  2. Don’t smoke or drink alcohol, as it may interfere with healing. 
  3. Don’t drive or fly until your doctor permits. 
Diet and Medications:
  1. Take pain medications as directed by your doctor. 
  2. Eat high-fibrous food and drink lots of water. 

First Follow-Up Appointment

  1. Your doctor will schedule the first follow-up appointment about two weeks after the surgery.
  2. The doctor will remove the sutures during this visit, examine your recovery, and provide further follow-up instructions. Furthermore, ask the doctor when you can return to work. 

What are the benefits of Microvascular Clipping?

Microvascular Clipping is a life-saving procedure which has the following benefits: 
  1. Prevents Neurological Brain Damage and Paralysis
  2. Negligible chance of recurrence
  3. Helps in reducing the size of larger aneurysms
  4. Smaller opening ,in the skull thereby less scarring
  5. Prevents rupture of the Aneurysm

What are the benefits of Microvascular Clipping?

Microvascular Clipping is a life-saving procedure which has the following benefits: 
  1. Prevents Neurological Brain Damage and Paralysis
  2. Negligible chance of recurrence
  3. Helps in reducing the size of larger aneurysms
  4. Smaller opening ,in the skull thereby less scarring
  5. Prevents rupture of the Aneurysm

What are the benefits of Microvascular Clipping?

Microvascular Clipping is a life-saving procedure which has the following benefits: 
  1. Prevents Neurological Brain Damage and Paralysis
  2. Negligible chance of recurrence
  3. Helps in reducing the size of larger aneurysms
  4. Smaller opening ,in the skull thereby less scarring
  5. Prevents rupture of the Aneurysm

Risks and Complications of Microvascular Clipping

Some potential complications of microvascular clipping include:
  1. Reaction to anaesthesia
  2. Infection
  3. Blood clots
  4. Kidney damage
  5. Seizures
  6. Stroke
  7. Weakness
  8. Numbness or tingling
  9. Visual changes
  10. Speech disturbances
  11. Memory loss or confusion
  12. A rupture in aneurysm during surgery
  13. Smoking, Obesity and High Blood Pressure may increase the risk of complications post-surgery.

When to Consult a Doctor?

Call your healthcare professional if you experience:
  1. Fever or chills, redness, swelling, drainage, Pain that does not improve with medication (Signs of infection at the surgical site)
  2. Difficulty in Breathing (blood clot in the lungs)
  3. Sudden and severe headache, Nausea and Vomiting, stiffness in neck (signs of Aneurysm Rupture)
  4. Drooping of Face, Slurred Speech, Weakness in Arms or legs and Confusion (Signs of Seizures)
  5. Increased drowsiness
  6. Worsening vision or pain
  7. Swelling or tenderness in the leg
  8. Bladder or bowel movements

Risks and Complications of Microvascular Clipping

Some potential complications of microvascular clipping include:
  1. Reaction to anaesthesia
  2. Infection
  3. Blood clots
  4. Kidney damage
  5. Seizures
  6. Stroke
  7. Weakness
  8. Numbness or tingling
  9. Visual changes
  10. Speech disturbances
  11. Memory loss or confusion
  12. A rupture in aneurysm during surgery
  13. Smoking, Obesity and High Blood Pressure may increase the risk of complications post-surgery.

When to Consult a Doctor?

Call your healthcare professional if you experience:
  1. Fever or chills, redness, swelling, drainage, Pain that does not improve with medication (Signs of infection at the surgical site)
  2. Difficulty in Breathing (blood clot in the lungs)
  3. Sudden and severe headache, Nausea and Vomiting, stiffness in neck (signs of Aneurysm Rupture)
  4. Drooping of Face, Slurred Speech, Weakness in Arms or legs and Confusion (Signs of Seizures)
  5. Increased drowsiness
  6. Worsening vision or pain
  7. Swelling or tenderness in the leg
  8. Bladder or bowel movements

Risks and Complications of Microvascular Clipping

Some potential complications of microvascular clipping include:
  1. Reaction to anaesthesia
  2. Infection
  3. Blood clots
  4. Kidney damage
  5. Seizures
  6. Stroke
  7. Weakness
  8. Numbness or tingling
  9. Visual changes
  10. Speech disturbances
  11. Memory loss or confusion
  12. A rupture in aneurysm during surgery
  13. Smoking, Obesity and High Blood Pressure may increase the risk of complications post-surgery.

When to Consult a Doctor?

Call your healthcare professional if you experience:
  1. Fever or chills, redness, swelling, drainage, Pain that does not improve with medication (Signs of infection at the surgical site)
  2. Difficulty in Breathing (blood clot in the lungs)
  3. Sudden and severe headache, Nausea and Vomiting, stiffness in neck (signs of Aneurysm Rupture)
  4. Drooping of Face, Slurred Speech, Weakness in Arms or legs and Confusion (Signs of Seizures)
  5. Increased drowsiness
  6. Worsening vision or pain
  7. Swelling or tenderness in the leg
  8. Bladder or bowel movements

Risks of Delaying Microvascular Clipping

Delaying a Microvascular Clipping Surgery could be life-threatening. Some Risks of Delaying Microvascular Surgery include: 
  1. Rupture and bleeding
  2. Build-up of fluid in brain (Hydrocephalus)
  3. Less oxygen reaches the brain as blood vessels gets narrowed (Vasospasm)
  4. Seizures or Convulsions
  5. Irreversible brain damage
  6. Loose consciousness for several days to weeks (Coma)

Risks of Delaying Microvascular Clipping

Delaying a Microvascular Clipping Surgery could be life-threatening. Some Risks of Delaying Microvascular Surgery include: 
  1. Rupture and bleeding
  2. Build-up of fluid in brain (Hydrocephalus)
  3. Less oxygen reaches the brain as blood vessels gets narrowed (Vasospasm)
  4. Seizures or Convulsions
  5. Irreversible brain damage
  6. Loose consciousness for several days to weeks (Coma)

Risks of Delaying Microvascular Clipping

Delaying a Microvascular Clipping Surgery could be life-threatening. Some Risks of Delaying Microvascular Surgery include: 
  1. Rupture and bleeding
  2. Build-up of fluid in brain (Hydrocephalus)
  3. Less oxygen reaches the brain as blood vessels gets narrowed (Vasospasm)
  4. Seizures or Convulsions
  5. Irreversible brain damage
  6. Loose consciousness for several days to weeks (Coma)

Cost of Microvascular Clipping

The cost of Microvascular Clipping ranges from ₹170000 to ₹250000. The price varies based on the following factors:
  1. Type of Microvascular Clipping surgery
  2. Age of the patient
  3. The medical condition of the patient
  4. The type of hospital facility availed - individual room or shared.
Procedure Name
Cost Value
Microvascular Clipping ₹170000 to ₹250000

Cost of Microvascular Clipping

The cost of Microvascular Clipping ranges from ₹170000 to ₹250000. The price varies based on the following factors:
  1. Type of Microvascular Clipping surgery
  2. Age of the patient
  3. The medical condition of the patient
  4. The type of hospital facility availed - individual room or shared.
Procedure Name
Cost Value
Microvascular Clipping ₹170000 to ₹250000

Cost of Microvascular Clipping

The cost of Microvascular Clipping ranges from ₹170000 to ₹250000. The price varies based on the following factors:
  1. Type of Microvascular Clipping surgery
  2. Age of the patient
  3. The medical condition of the patient
  4. The type of hospital facility availed - individual room or shared.
Procedure Name
Cost Value
Microvascular Clipping ₹170000 to ₹250000

Expert Doctors

Dr. Nishchint Jain
Hexa Partner

Neurointerventional Surgery

12+ Years

Experience

100%

Recommended

Dr. Joy Dev Mukherji
Hexa Partner

Neurosciences, Neurology

39+ Years

Experience

100%

Recommended

NABH Accredited Hospitals

CDAS Super Speciality Hospital
JCI
NABH

CDAS Super Speciality Hospital

4.55/5(78 Ratings)
Sector 47, Gurgaon
Lifeaid Medical Centre
JCI
NABH

Lifeaid Medical Centre

4.62/5(81 Ratings)
Sector 40, Gurgaon

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